Monday, 13 June 2016

On 01:25 by admin   No comments
Users accounts for iMesh, a now defunct file sharing service, are for sale on the dark web.

The New York-based music and video sharing company was a peer-to-peer service, which rose to fame in the file sharing era of the early-2000s, riding the waves of the aftermath of the "dotcom" boom. After the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) sued the company in 2003 for encouraging copyright infringement, the company was given status as the first "approved" peer-to-peer service.

At its peak in 2009, the service became the third-largest service in the US. But last month, iMesh unexpectedly shut down after more than a decade in business.

LeakedSource, a breach notification site that allows users to see if their details have been leaked, has obtained the database.

The group's analysis of the database shows it contains a little over 51 million accounts.

The database, of which a portion was shared with ZDNet for verification, contains user information that dates back to late-2005 when the site launched, including email addresses, passwords (which were hashed and salted with MD5, an algorithm that nowadays is easy to crack), usernames, a user's location and IP address, registration date, and other information -- such as if the account is disabled, or if the account has inbox messages.

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